Birds in Mythology





Rising above the earth and soaring through the skies, birds have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages. In many myths and legends, birds link the human world to the divine or supernatural realms that lie beyond ordinary experience.

Birds assume a variety of roles in mythology and religion. They play a central part in some creation myths and frequently appear as messengers of the deities. They are often associated with the journey of the human soul after death. Birds also appear as tricksters and oracles. Ravens and other species that feed on carrion, the flesh of the dead, may be symbols of war, death, and misfortune, as well as mediators between humans and the supernatural world. Other birds represent strength, love, and wisdom.


Birds and Creation

Myths from several regions associate birds with the creation of the world. One of several creation stories in ancient Egypt said that when land rose out of the primeval waters of chaos, the first deity to appear was a bird perching on that land. The Egyptians called the god the Benu bird and portrayed it as a long-legged, wading heron in the sun temple at Heliopolis. The Benu bird created the universe and then made gods and goddesses and men to live in that universe.

A number of creation myths from Southeast Asia feature birds. On the great island of Borneo dwell the Iban people, who tell of Ara and Irik, two bird spirits floating above an expanse of water at the beginning of time. Seizing two eggs from the water, Ara made the sky from one egg, while Irik made the earth from the other. As Irik squeezed the earth into its proper size, mountains and rivers appeared on its surface. Then the two creator spirits shaped bits of earth into the first people and woke them to life with bird cries.

Other creation stories begin with the laying of a cosmic egg from which the universe emerges. Indonesia, Polynesia, and the northern European countries of Finland and Estonia have stories of deities flying down to the primeval ocean to lay eggs that hatch into the world.

Birds appear in some myths as earth divers. An earth diver is an animal that plunged to the bottom of the primeval sea and brought up mud from which the earth was formed. Legends of the Buriat and Samoyed people of Siberia feature birds as earth divers. Water birds such as ducks or swans play this role in the creation myths of many Native American peoples, including the Mandan of North Dakota. A Navajo myth about a great flood tells that the people fled to an upper world, leaving everything behind. The bird Turkey then dived into the lower world to rescue seeds so that the people could grow food crops.

supernatural related to forces beyond the normal world; magical or miraculous

deity god or goddess

trickster mischievous figure appearing in various forms in the folktales and mythology of many different peoples

oracle priest or priestess or other creature through whom a god is believed to speak; also the location (such as a shrine) where such words are spoken

mediator go-between

primeval from the earliest times

chaos great disorder or confusion

cosmic large or universal in scale; having to do with the universe

Sometimes mythological birds create more than the physical world. Cultures in northern Europe and Asia credited birds with establishing their social orders, especially kingships. A golden-winged eagle was said to have put the first Mongol* emperor on his throne. The Japanese believed that sacred birds guided their second emperor in conquering his enemies before the

This Tlingit hat is adorned with a raven, an important mythological character for many Native Americans of Alaska. Considered both a hero and a trickster, the raven presented many gifts to humans including light, names for plants, and formations of the earth.
This Tlingit hat is adorned with a raven, an important mythological character for many Native Americans of Alaska. Considered both a hero and a trickster, the raven presented many gifts to humans including light, names for plants, and formations of the earth.

*See Names and Places at the end of this volume for further information.

founding of his dynasty. The Magyar people claimed that a giant eagle, falcon, or hawk had led their first king into Hungary, where he founded their nation. The Magyars looked upon this bird as their mythical ancestor.


Life, Death, and the Soul

Many myths have linked birds to the arrival of life or death. With their power of flight, these winged creatures were seen as carriers or symbols of the human soul, or as the soul itself, flying heavenward after a person died. A bird may represent both the soul of the dead and a deity at the same time.


Bringers of Life and Death. Some cultures have associated birds with birth, claiming that a person's soul arrived on earth in bird form. A remnant of this ancient belief has survived into modern times: one traditional answer to a child's question "Where do babies come from?" is "The stork brings them."

Birds have also been linked with death. Carrion-eating birds such as vultures, crows, and ravens, for example, were connected with disaster and war. Celtic* and Irish war goddesses often appeared in the form of crows and ravens—perhaps because crows and ravens were known to gather over battlefields and to feast on the flesh of fallen warriors. It was said that if one of these goddesses appeared before an army going into battle, the army would be defeated.

The mythological bird called the phoenix combined images of birth and death to become a powerful symbol of eternal rebirth. According to Egyptian legend, the phoenix burned up every 500 years but was then miraculously reborn out of its own ashes, so it was truly immortal. In myths from China and Japan, the phoenix does not emerge from a fire but instead causes itself to be reborn during times of good fortune.


The Flight of the Soul Numerous myths have linked birds to the journeys undertaken by human souls after death. Sometimes a bird acts as a guide in the afterlife. In Syria, figures of eagles on tombs represent the guides that lead souls to heaven. The soul guide in Jewish tradition is a dove.

In some cultures, it was thought that the soul, once freed from the body, took the form of a bird. The ancient Egyptians believed that the soul, the ba, could leave the dead body in the form of a bird, often a hawk. They built their graves and tombs with narrow shafts leading to the open air so that these birds could fly in and out, keeping watch on the body. The feather cloaks that Central American and Mexican priests and kings wore may have been connected to the idea of a soul journey.

dynasty succession of rulers from the same family or group

immortal able to live forever

imperial relating to an emperor or empire

Because of their great size and strength, eagles have been associated with royal or imperial souls. Some ancient peoples, including the Romans, would release an eagle at a ruler's funeral. As it rose into the sky the mighty bird was seen as the ruler's spirit taking its place in the heavens.

The Greeks and Celts thought that the dead could reappear as birds. The Sumerians of the ancient Near East believed that the dead existed as birds in the underworld. According to Islamic tradition, all dead souls remain in the form of birds until Judgment Day, while in Christian tradition, the gentle dove became a symbol of the immortal soul ascending to heaven. Birds also appear in Hindu mythology as symbols of the soul or as forms taken by the soul between earthly lives. The connection between birds and souls is sometimes reflected in language. A Turkish saying describes somebody's death as "His soul bird has flown away."


Becoming a Bird. Under certain conditions, the living could be transformed into birds. In some cultures, it was believed that shamans, priests, and prophets could change themselves into birds during trances or other mystical states. Such ideas were found in Siberia and Indonesia. In Celtic mythology, both deities and the sly supernatural beings called fairies or fays were said to have the power to transform themselves into birds.

Some legends involve birds that change into or inhabit the bodies of humans. The Central American god Quetzalcoatl, a combination of a bird and a serpent, appears as a culture hero or a god in human form in Toltec, Maya, and Aztec myths. Among certain peoples in northern Europe and Asia, the spirits of birds such as eagles, owls, and crows are said to enter the bodies of shamans to inspire them.

In some myths, humans and other beings acquire the ability to fly like birds. Such supernatural flight, like many mythological powers, can be either good or evil. Norse* tales told that the goddess Freya's feather cloak enabled the wearer to fly. European tradition portrayed angels with wings like those of birds, but devils often had bat wings. Japanese mythology includes a group of winged deities known as tengu. Part bird and part human, they live in forests and occasionally use their powers to play tricks on people.


Winged Wisdom

Birds in mythology sometimes have the ability to speak. These talking birds, often sources of wisdom, may be deities in bird form or simply messengers of the deities. Either way, their advice is generally sound, and humans ignore it at their peril. Birds warn of dangers ahead, reveal secrets, and guide heroes and travelers on their way.

Birds do not always speak in human languages; many stories tell of people who gain the power to understand the language of birds. In Greek mythology, a snake licked the ears of the prophet Cassandra, who could then understand what the birds were saying. After tasting the magical blood of a slain dragon, the German hero Siegfried knew what the forest birds were saying.

shaman person thought to possess spiritual and healing powers prophet one who claims to have received divine messages or insights

culture hero mythical figure who gives people the tools of civilization, such as language and fire

Some birds are believed to have special powers of telling the future or revealing the will of the gods. Magpies, ravens, and doves appear in myth as oracles. In Iranian mythology, birds communicate

*See Names and Places at the end of this volume for further information.

In Hindu mythology, Garuda was a creature with a human body and an eagle
In Hindu mythology, Garuda was a creature with a human body and an eagle's head, wings, and talons. This Indian miniature painting portrays Garuda with the god Vishnu and his wife on his back.

divine wisdom to people. The Hottentot people of southern Africa believe that the hammerhead, a wading bird, can see reflections of the future in pools of water. When the bird learns that someone is about to die, it flies to the person's home and gives three cries of warning.


Common Birds in Mythology

Certain birds appear over and over again in the world's myths and legends, although not always in the same roles. The crow and its close relative the raven, for example, have a number of different meanings. In some cultures, they are oracles and symbols of death. In Norse mythology, Odin* was always accompanied by two wise ravens that told him everything that happened on earth. According to Greek mythology, the feathers of crows and ravens were originally white, but the god Apollo punished the birds—either for telling secrets or for failing in their duty as guardians—by turning them black.

Related Entries

Other entries related to birds in mythology are listed at the end of this article.

For some Native Americans, such as the Tsimshian people of the Pacific Northwest, Raven is both a trickster and a culture hero. Sometimes his antics shake up the gods and the established order of the universe, and sometimes they backfire and get him into trouble. Often, though, Raven's deeds benefit humankind, as in the legend of how Raven brought light into the world. After finding the hiding place where the Creator kept the moon, the stars, and daylight, Raven released them so that they could shine on the world.

The majestic eagle, sometimes called the king of birds, usually has divine or royal associations in myth. Images from the ancient Near East and Iran show the sun with an eagle's wings, a sign that the bird was linked to the sun god. The eagle was also a symbol of Jupiter, the supreme Roman deity, and a sign of strength and courage. By adopting the eagle as their symbol, kings from ancient to recent times have tried to suggest that they, too, had some divine or heroic qualities.

Stories of eagles fighting snakes or dragons represent the tension between light and darkness, heavenly and underworld forces. In the myths of various Native American peoples, the eagle is a culture hero, a hunter or a tornado transformed into a bird, and the spirit of war and hunting. The eagle was also the great culture hero of Siberian mythology

In the ancient Near East and in Greece, the dove was a symbol of love and fertility, often associated with goddesses of love such as the Greek Aphrodite. In China doves represent tranquility and faithfulness in marriage, while in India they symbolize the soul.

When owls appear in mythology, their meaning is often uncertain and complex, neither all good nor all bad. Owls are symbols of wisdom, patience, and learning, yet because they hunt at night, they are associated with secrecy and darkness. In China they are seen as signs of coming misfortune. According to the Hottentot people of Africa, the hooting of an owl at night is an omen of death.

Early cultures in Mexico regarded owls as sacred to the rain god, but later the Aztecs of the same region viewed them as evil night demons. Some Native American legends portray owls as destructive and malicious; others show them as helpful beings who warn people of dangers. The stories may include a person who is transformed into an owl. In the Navajo creation myth, an owl resolves a bitter quarrel between men and women, allowing the creation of the human race.

Bats also symbolize both good and evil in mythology. Chinese legends link the bat with good fortune. A group of five bats represents five causes of happiness: wealth, health, long life, virtue, and a natural death. In various other cultures, however, bats are often connected with witches or evil spirits, and demons are pictured with bat wings.

The Deathless Hoyl Bird

Jewish mythology includes the story of the hoyl—a bird that, like the phoenix, is devoured by divine fire only to rise from its own ashes. Legend says that after Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden, Adam offered the fruit to all of the animals. The hoyl bird was the only one that refused to eat the fruit that God had said must never be eaten. As a reward, the hoyl received a kind of immortality. It never dies but only goes to sleep, after which fire destroys it. An egg remains, however, and from that egg a full-grown hoyl hatches anew.

Other birds have special meanings in myths. Swans, with their white feathers and graceful appearance, often serve as symbols of purity and feminine beauty. Both Celtic and Norse mythology included tales of women who turned into swans. Male peacocks, endowed with splendid tail feathers, can suggest either foolish vanity or divine glory. In legends from India, they often appear being ridden by one of the gods.

See also Afterlife ; Animals in Mythology ; Creation Stories ; Firebird ; Phoenix ; Quetzalcoatl ; Thunderbird .



User Contributions:

Becky
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May 21, 2007 @ 3:15 pm
I wanted to research about crows and if they are really dead souls.. do you think you could answer that question...?
Linda Isaacs
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Jul 9, 2007 @ 9:09 am
As I was having my morning coffee on my veranda.I looked up at the sky and I felt i needed to talk to my dead mother in law.whom I was very close to, I actually asked for a sign,pertaining to what I was talking to her about.I brought my coffee cup into the house,had breakfast, came back out and there on the table ,on the veranda, was a dead little bird,that looked like it was laid there,no signs of hitting anything, no blood! I am not crazy, but this has me pretty shook up. can you tell me anything about this? What does it mean? Thank you
Lizabeth Smith
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Aug 7, 2008 @ 2:02 am
Linda,
I read your story, and I seem to understand, although I cannot explain it. I have heard two other people say that when they think about a relative who has passed away, they have seen red robins appear out of nowhere. Maybe we see the symbolism that we need to, during a certain situation in our life, then we take notice, and it makes you think, realize.
Twice in my life, the symbols of birds have affected me. Last year, I saw an owl fly in front of my car, never happened before? I live in Hawaii. I never noticed owls before? Then for the next few days, I saw owls everywhere I went, picture of an owl on a child's video at the store, picture of an owl on a child's T-shirt at another store, etc. I did not understand, but took notice of the owl, which had never happened in my life? Sadly, within the next few days, a child in my community, a friend of my daughter, passed away, died from an accidental drowning. Then the symbol of the owl hit me so hard. I researched, and found the owl is the symbol or messenger, sometimes of death.
Also for the past several weeks, I have kept seeing small birds fly so fast in front of my car, out of nowhere, not flocks of birds, just single small birds. It happened about a dozen times, one small bird even came so close to hitting my dash. I commented to my sister and my daughter, I didn't want this to happen anymore, I didn't want the birds to get hurt. I explained to my daughter that mother birds sometimes protect their nests, and try to distract danger away from their baby birds. I kept thinking, "protect the babies, protect the children?? over and over..." This morning, I was shocked and so saddened. One of my good friends, just lost his little girl in an accident a few days ago. She was his baby, only five years old. I cried so much today....so I researched symbols of birds, and I found this website and read your message.
I do not feel that we have special intuition, I just believe that sometimes things in nature or life, make you take notice and think, almost a premonition? Take notice of the symbols you see in your life, or warnings?
Sincerely,
Lizabeth
Karen
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Dec 6, 2008 @ 3:15 pm
I wanted to thank you for sharing this information. I recently went on a trip to Denver to consider moving there. I went with a friend to explore downtown Denver on one night and encountered what I can not pass off as any less than a synchronicity.

Of the 5 places we went that night, 3 of the places had birds hanging from the ceiling. First we went to a restaurant where a seagull hung from the ceiling.

The second place was a coffee shop with many origami birds hung from the ceiling.

The third place was a lounge with many doves hanging from the ceiling.

This caught my attention. I'm not sure what the birds may mean exactly, but I am definitely paying attention.

Anyway, I decided to do a search for 'what do birds symbolize', and I found your entry.

Sometimes it's good to view life from a 'birds eye view', realizing that we do not see everything from out human perspective.

Birds intuitively know where to go as they migrate through the seasons change. I will trust this intuitive wisdom of the birds...that I will surly find my way home.

Thank you for sharing and namaste!
Karen
allison
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Mar 1, 2009 @ 4:16 pm
A few days ago i was at work scrapping glue off of a filter cap and by accident there was some glue still on the cap in shape of a bird. It was a perfect shape of a bird. It looked like an exact picture of a bird flying. I took it as a sign but im not sure what it means. Do have have any idea of what it represents?
michael
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May 14, 2009 @ 2:14 pm
when a falcon perches on the trunk of my car i walked up to it when i got 4 feet from him. he flew away looking back. is there a hidden meaning sbout this. i know the falcon represents strenght, love and wisdom.
Rainer
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Aug 30, 2009 @ 9:09 am
Hi. Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. Help me! Looking for sites on: Opalescence humility. I found only this - treswhite opalescence. In canada, review cells are known by the thermodynamic fluctuations. Lifeways of life of transition ban areas and low phenomena were related by mason, et al, opalescence boost. Best regards :confused:, Rainer from Afghanistan.
Ann
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Jan 31, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
Hi, I had a similar thing happen to me..I was visited by a finch or it could have been a sparrow..I was just hanging around on the front porch perched between the grill of the security door..I walked up to it thinking it would fly away but it just stayed there so I put my hand up to pat it and it jumped on to my finger so I took it inside and put it down on my desk next to my keyboard and it sat there while I typed emails..then when it was time to go to bed I tried to take it outside to let it go but it didn't want to fly away..so I took it in to my bedroom and on the pillow next to me but every time I turned the light off it flew around..Then I just decided to sleep with the light on and it stayed on the pillow next to me the whole night. The next morning I tried to let it fly away again but still it didn't want to go. But I had to go to work and I didn't know what to do so I put it in an old cage that I had until I could come back at lunch time. Then when I came back and opened the cage it just flew away as soon as I opened the door. It was a really strange thing and not sure what it could have meant if anything or whether the bird came from an aviary across the road. But still quite strange that it didn't fly away at any chance it had the previous night and how content it was just to sit there with me the whole night. If anyone has any thoughts would love to hear them. Cheers!
Ira
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Jun 25, 2010 @ 10:10 am
Any suggestions as to the portrayl of wings? why on the back or upper shoulder in most Roman/Greco/Christian etc and on the frontal brow in Eastern cultures? Would appreciate any input.
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Jul 7, 2010 @ 10:10 am
Birds have been coming at me and yesterday one was in front of my house...5 days befor one came stright towards my friends car we hit it...I know something is up I just do not know wht it is... I don't feel like it has to do with me ... I have always had symbols with birds they fly at me and even in my car...
Demetra
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Jul 15, 2010 @ 1:13 pm
Thank you for the information, I was researching ravens and stumbbled on to this site. It's lovely ^.^ You really helped me with my research on this bird especially to its link to death. I myself didn't know most of the things here even thou I'm a occult and supernatural dork. I've never had a sign appear before me but my friend has:

She and her friends were playing infront of the house when an old woman came out of nowhere and looked at a cucoo on the roof. She said 'Be careful children' and left. The next day my friends grandfather died.

Another friend's story is...

When she was still living in her old home a bird was standing somewhere on a tree, some (perfectly healthy) man jumped out of nowhere saying 'Oh, no you don't! Nobody else is going to die here! Not on my watch!' and shot the bird down with a gun. The next day the same man died.

My friends family moved out at the first chanse they got. I think the bird was a cucoo.
Donna
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Dec 7, 2010 @ 11:23 pm
My dog was slowly dying of kidney failure and I knew I would have to put him down soon. The decison was making me so depressed. I was crying all the time. We would go to the park for walks almost every day since he was a puppy. One day I decided to take him to the park because we were not going as often since he was sick and maybe I could gauge his spirts and how much life was left. Once we got to the park he was excited and started running and I started feeling better. Then he got tired and laid down in the middle of the grass. I laid next to him and looked up in the sky. As i gazed up, I noticed two hawks soaring. That is very unusual in our neighboorhood. Then they got so high they disappeared but two ravens flew into the air where they where. A peace came over me and I knew it was a sign that it was time. That was our last day together. I miss him but did not want him to suffer any more. I am an avid bird watcher and believe that nature does talk to us, if we listen.
john
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Apr 26, 2011 @ 8:08 am
Hi, im doing a project on mythology of birds and im thinking of doing one on why birds migrate during the winter.

can you help me out.
Doug
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May 2, 2011 @ 1:01 am
My father passed away in October of '08. While getting dressed for his funeral in the basement bedroom where I was staying at my parents' home, a small bird flew into the room and sat atop the dresser mirror. After a few moments, it flew out of the room. I unlocked and opened the door in the basement that lead outdoors, and the bird flew away. Neither the windows nor the door had been opened in the three days I had been staying there, and the chimney flue was closed. No one in the house at the time had any idea how a bird could get into the basement. I'm not one who normally looks for meaning in random events, but I had a strong feeling that day that my father was telling me that everything was OK.
Teresa
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Jun 5, 2011 @ 12:12 pm
My father told me that in Poland there were stories about associations between birds and death. My mother-in-law, who is also Polish, says the same.

My nephew died at 9 months of age. For a week before that accidental death, a robin kept tapping at the window of the house. My mother put foil over the window, but the tapping continued. It stopped when he died.

After my grandmother's death, my mother and I were in the house, and heard a noise from the attic. We opened the door, and out flew a crow. We had no idea how it got there. We ran down the steps, with the crow flying alongside, and opened the kitchen door. It flew directly out, as if it knew the way. I said, "Good-bye, Grandma!" as it left.

A friend of mine at work was killed suddenly and violently some years ago. Although I'd only known her a short time, I knew she was a lovely person and I wanted to communicate that to her family. Finally, I wrote them a sympathy card saying how much I enjoyed being Joan's friend, if only for a short while. All this time, a bird tapped nearly every day on my bedroom window. The bird stopped on the day I got a return letter from Joan's family thanking me for my sentiments. As if the bird was saying "now it's done."

I have other bird and death stories. Glad I found this site with so many others who have had these experiences.
Fran
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Jul 20, 2011 @ 9:21 pm
My beloved 11 year old border collie dog was diagnosed with terminal cancer over six months ago. We kept her at home on medication and promised ourselves we would put her to sleep when we thought she was not getting pain relief. We live in country Queensland, Australia, and for the first three days of this week there were two white birds, almost like flamingos only pure white, just slowly walking around our lawn in the dawn fog. Our neighbours who have lived here for many years said they had never seen a bird like them around here. Each morning they would appear on our lawn, one day almost on our porch and then not long after I had seen them each day they would just fly off into the fog. I had been asking for a sign to let me know when it was time for Tess to be put to sleep and I am convinced this was it. We said our goodbyes and held her close as the vet helped her pass. It has been three days since and the birds have not come back although every day I have looked to the sky to talk to Tess and seen a pair of white birds just flying overhead. I have read that when you ask for a sign white feathers might appear in strange places to help you and I am sure these birds were just that. God speed to our most beautiful Tess.
Shelley
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Sep 2, 2011 @ 9:09 am
A falcon showed in our yard the day and then closer the day of my mother-in-law's funeral. What does symbolize? Also a black panther was sitting by the sideof the roadon our way home from the hospital before she passed. My husband and I both saw it and it looked at us and jumped over the guardrails into the woods. We felt it was a rare sighting and probably a sign. If you can shed light on these, thank you.
Roy
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Jan 10, 2012 @ 4:04 am
A falcon, not a very common bird in the area I`m working in, landed on my window several times.
It all started when it crushed on my window (no harm done to the bird), than it returned and landed the same day for 2 more times.
A day after that it landed again and after a week it visited again. I must had that there are plenty of places for it to land but it returns only to my window to land.
Every time it stays for few seconds, looking directly at me and takes off until next time.
What does it mean? What does it symbolize?
Please, help me understand it.
Thank you
jess
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Feb 1, 2012 @ 9:21 pm
In November our dog became very ill, she was old and we knew the day would come. On the day we went to take her in to be put to rest we let her bask in the sun for a couple of hours. While we were out in the yard with her 2 eagles flew about. There was also a Turkey Vulture that circled a couple of times. After reading through this site it has given me comfort that she is in a better place now & it was her time. We miss her so much. Is there a meaning to this?
Kim
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Aug 13, 2012 @ 8:20 pm
Zoey, my Catahoula Leopard Dog had always been aware of birds, we would be out running in the woods and she would stop and look up, above us, 20 ft or so would be a bird perched -how she knew it was there or was aware of it's flight is beyond me. Birds also noticed her, we had come across a turkey vulture on the ridge one day and we all stopped and took a good long look at each other before going our separate ways - the next day about 5 miles away, Z & I were out for a walk and saw the shadow of these huge wings on the ground - we looked up and there was the turkey vulture circling and peering down at us.
Three days after she passed in May, two doves landed on the flower mound we buried her in, we have never had doves visit our yard before, they stayed about 3 hours, in my heart I knew it was Z saying "you gotta tell my mom I'm at peace, you gotta send 2 doves, not 1, just to make sure she gets it."
That same dove day, our other dog Riley started chasing birds from tree to tree, like they were playing catch me if you can - he only did it that one evening and hasn't "played" with the birds since - my sense was that Zoey was using the birds to convey her presence.
Then a couple of weeks later, I was writing how much I missed Zoey and as I was writing the word "miss," I saw movement from the corner of my eye - it was a dove landing in the yard.
The last definite sign from Z was about a month later, there was a faint partial rainbow directly above her burial mound.
Zoey was a very special dog and after reading this site, it seems to confirm my feeling that birds are messengers between worlds. Thank you.
Mary
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Oct 20, 2012 @ 9:09 am
Just three days ago I'm sitting in a chair in the living room thinking how very tired I am when I looked up at the ceiling and saw a cluster of colored orbs swirling around. Next thing I hear a bang . I look over and their was Blue Jay on my window sill chirping away like crazy at me. When I rose it flew way. What do you think it might mean?
Mary Lou Burkett
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Apr 16, 2013 @ 10:10 am
Yesterday I was working around my flowers, earlie spring flowers blooming i.e. daffidolis, jonquils, etc., and found a dead robin. We have robins in our area, but I have never found a dead one. I have a daughter who has been very sick for about 4 years, and I'm so afraid that I'm going to loose her. Could this be some type of sign, whether it is about her or someone else? I have enjoyed reading all the comments on this site. If anyone can give me some insight, I would certainly appreciate it.
chrissy
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May 30, 2013 @ 3:15 pm
I was walking my 3yr old son and stopped next to tree my son began playing in grass a lil bird all a sudden fell from tree landed on head died instantly what does that mean
Desiree
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Jul 15, 2013 @ 10:10 am
Please can anyone shed any light on what I am going to tell you... My darling man of 2 1/2 years passed away, he had been suffering with severe depression since a young boy,and eventually found out the reasons but could not find the courage to break free from his emotional abuser... he had existed all these years only when he was away from her, when we were together he tried so hard to break free from her.. anyway last week he went into the woods his favorite place and hung himself...I was treated as a stranger by the only 2 people he had in his family as we were not married I had no rights.. yesterday my daughter and me were sitting in our living room and through the half open door a small bird, flew in low and came and sat under the window on the floor and just stared at us, it had not banged into anything, we both panicked and 5 min later I managed to get a towel and put over it, yet it did not move away. i called my neighbor and he put a tray under it, took it outside and lifted the towel, and it flew away, it look like a small baby bird, sparrow or starling...
BJ
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Aug 2, 2013 @ 11:11 am
I know how "crazy" this sounds but it is "very" true. Have been trying to research it but cannot find anything like it.. In 06 I was cleaning some windows at my home we have in the country on 10 acres.. I had laid a bathroom window screen up against a tree next to the house. After I replaced the screen, I & my older son kept seeing a image in the screen like a face of a man oversized head and dressed like a leprechaun body. Even a hat like would be worn in the Columbus era.. The face would change, mouth would move & the eyes would follow you but you never actually saw it move. But my son was really freaked out about it. He to this day hates this house. In 2010 we remodeled the bathroom. I picked the screen up & punched out the screen that my husband put on the ground to replace it with a new screen. I put the old screen in a pile of things that we were burning in the back yard & covered it up with more stuff to be burned. As it started burning there was a
"loud bunch of birds", I think they were small black birds, that flocked over the property. "Hundreds of birds". My daughter in law and younger son came outside to see what was going on.. Before they got to me, I saw the image being carried off by two birds up into the air that looked like sparrow's, the two little birds had ahold of the image's jacket shoulder's and saw the face with this mouth open as though he were saying "NO".. When the image disappeared so did the birds. They all flew off West in the direction of the image and the two birds carrying it.. I have never spoken to anyone about this because I know how crazy it sounds.. And I have never experienced anything like it since.. If anyone has any feed back on birds carrying off soles of the damned please let me know..
jonathon dunn
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Aug 25, 2013 @ 3:15 pm
I am 53 years old. My wife died a few years ago, I am a Mountain hiker, the first time after she passed I parked to start my mountain hike, I pulled into the car park, my window half down, as soon as I had stopped the car a beautiful bird the likes of which I have never seen before or since landed on my wing mirror and sang an enchanting song to me through the open window. This has never happened before or since.

Before my Brother died a Raven tapped on my window every day for weeks. During that time I moved house 5 miles away and A Raven tapped daily on that window, it stopped after he passed. As with me and the song bird above, my Mother had the exact same experience when my Brother passed.

I have had three birds fly into the house this 2 months, I live in the country and see and hear a lot of birds, I know them by sound as I listen to them every day. This morning before I got out of bed I could hear a bird I had not heard here before, it was a Dove, not an uncommon bird but the first I have ever seen or heard one here. Within the hour I had a call my Mum had passed away. Mum hated pigeons!

I think that Lizabeth at the start of this chain has a very strong point on how we make interpret our subconscious feelings in the things we see around us, I believe this is a sense we all have but don't often use. However, for me there is also an undeniable link between people I have lost and the behaviour of birds. I like the idea that they are conveyers of the soul.
Neva
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Dec 9, 2013 @ 4:16 pm
I have had two different encounters with birds and death of family members. There is some truth in mythology.

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